Jack came in for his intake session still shaking and trembling from withdrawal from alcohol. He was barely able to sign his name and was tearful as he told his story. He told of how he had been sober for 4 years but had relapsed 2 years ago and was unable to stop drinking on his own. He had lost his job, home and his family and was on the verge of drinking himself to death.

Jack was lucky enough to have someone give him a chance to work so he was employed while in outpatient treatment. He was attending AA every day and working with a sponsor but remained stubborn and set in his ways – refusing to change his unhealthy living environment. Jack was over-confident and decided to “test” his recovery by staying at a hotel for a weekend. He thought this experiment was successful as he didn’t drink that weekend, however he was slowly letting down his guard and within 3 weeks he was drinking again.

He disappeared for a while and when he resurfaced, he was the trembling, tearful man again. He agreed to move into an Oxford House and remain humble when it came to his relapse risk. He was encouraged to look deep inside to discover the pain that has contributed to his drinking and to identify the functions that alcohol has played in his life.

He opened himself up to the treatment process and was able to identify ways to intervene with high-risk thoughts, feelings and situations without the use of alcohol. He was challenged that if he stayed sober, his life would improve tremendously and great things will happen. It was even suggested that he might someday become president of his Oxford House — to which he humbly replied, “No, I will never do that”.

That was in June 2015. Just the other day, Jack came into our facility to thank us for helping him to achieve more than he had ever dreamed of. With joyous tears in his eyes, he stated, “All the things you said would come true have, and even more, and I want to thank you”.

He was now president of his Oxford House, advancing at his job, spending quality time with his family, attending AA and most importantly he has found peace and serenity and the will to live.